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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
and his minister also devote energy to foreign policy. he says they will strengthen diplomatic and security policies. >> translator: we should rebuild our diplomacy to protect our national interests. we are facing many challenges in our relations with china, south korea and even with the united states on which japan's security is based. strengthening japan/ize lie yans is the first step toward rebuilding japan's diplomacy and security. >> abe promised the central government will take the lead in rebuilding disaster-hit regions in northeastern japan, especially fukushima prefecture, home to the damaged nuclear plant. the new prime minister says he will achieve results as soon as possible to redeem the trust of the japanese people. >>> prime minister abe's launched his cabinet tuesday after the top lawmakers elected him to the top job. both houses of parliament elected abe as prime minister, a post he held between 2006 and 2007. abe is the first politician in 64 years to return to the position after resigning. his liberal democrats ruled japan almost continuously for half a centu
and in iran nuclear program continues to progress. look at the foreign policy challenges facing the united states in 2013. because youry wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ >> from iran's nuclear ambition toss china's nationalist im
implications for the foreign policy and wha in what is happen the middle east, john negroponte, the first director of national intelligence appointed by george w. bush serving five times as an investor and in his distinguished career in intelligence and diplomacy. great to have you with us. >> thank you. lou: let's start with the middle east. president morsi, ordering the military to arrest civilians. what is your reaction? >> i just think it is administration of the precariousness of the situation in egypt, but that situation is critical. we can't afford to see egypt go over some kind of a brink. they are crucial to the middle east peace process. wo perhaps if egypt were to pull back from the recognition of israel, the largest arab country population in the region, therev is a critical role to play in many different ways. lou: the way his administration has engaged the muslim brotherhood, the army and egypt and what the likely result will be, are you optimistic that his diplomacy is on the correct path? >> i think it started out quite seriously, nobody knew what was going to happen when
at the peer review journal of foreign policy and the senior contributor to the. [indiscernible] which many of us, the first things we looked at in the morning. >> after? >> after. and a member of the court association of america. the clerk for the hon. warship berge john and barquette . and while a law student he was an editor from the yale law journal. i believe that is accredited. so as you can see, at two very talented. their debate is entitled to, detention policies. the way we set it up was we have -- in the book we will do it as live. steven will start and then will have great respond. >> great. thank you. it's a pleasure to be here. >> seven the fortitude to invite me to participate. i am a firm believer that the best they we can do as academics is raise the level debate. projects like this can only help in that regard with folks actually engaging with each other as opposed to talking past each other. let me offer couple of brief remarks that i lost a consistent with what i said in the book. i want to suggest that of all the myriad questions one could ask about the future of u.s. de
several nonfiction titles included in foreign policy magazine must read books. >> booktv is here at the annual national press club authors night and joining us now is author r. renshaw agree who has written a book called first cameraman. what is with the obama administration. >> is a videographer, sent in a carriage for a few years in the white house. the lifecycle did not work on the campaign formally or the white house power to the new and strange world of super pacs and independent expenditures. spectaculars about the campaign into destiny. as you get hooked up in a president? >> it is the right place, right time. a friend of mine was working at cnn as a documentary producer and has a more normal path into politics. i was not the first on anyone's list. she would knew i wanted to get involved in broadband and then i just hit it off with the senator and started traveling inside the bubble. >> how long did you do it? was a 24/7 for a while? >> you know, especially on the campaign, it really felt like 20 for seven. i was practically living in chicago when i was there too were thr
are making on the vigor transforming the role of the day so very unfortunate results. you talk about foreign policy as being at least two ideas or and although she's in play and i would be interested -- i keep on thinking that you are a vietnam analogy by and we must stand tough but you wouldn't subscribe to that. >> it's a special representation in the first place which dominates the rest of the book and in vietnam i think you have to take them both together. you cannot be in munich or vietnam. munich is an ethnology that tends to thrive when the country has been in peace and prosperity for long enough it feels it can do anything. it feels it can intervene on behalf of subject and oppressed people around the world and it doesn't think about the cost it hasn't had to pay the cost for several decades now. vietnam is about taking care of one's own the and paying attention to how things can go wrong despite the best of intentions. if he were a total vietnam person you will be such a realist that would be crude you wouldn't have anything on the interest and to the nation requires ideals for the
god bless you and god bless america. [applause] >> tomorrow morning a look at foreign policy in 2012. then the biggest political stories of 2012 with fox news political analyst juan williams. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors an
. the foreign policy was that significant, and its domestic ramifications were that significant. jefferson was terrified that the british were coming back. the good thing about this argument is they did, so you win. you win the argument. the war of 1812 happened. and so we had to have a ratifying conflict which jefferson always suspected. and i think was, in some ways, the inevitable result of the unlikely victory we won in the first place, this odd coastal republic that managed to defeat the world's greatest empire. jefferson wanted us to see him as a, see himself as a defender and parent of this revolution in the sense of the great thinker, the great arcticlator of the principles of republican liberty. and he was that. but he was also an awfully good vote getter and deal cutter. and i think that's okay because, as jefferson himself said, it is best to give as well as to take in a system like ours. and without mutual concessions, the republic itself would crack and crumble and be vulnerable to the kind of reaction, the kind of returning monarchy and mono-- monoaround kim -- we didn't say
world and the tendency of american foreign policy at the time to think that you could fix and watch with a hammer. yeah, so we did. we went on the road and in many ways had our faith in the american process and our country restored by meeting some wonderful, committed people, who really mean extremely well and have the future of this country in their hearts and minds. but we raised the better part of $10 million, and it ain't right, you know? i do not know a lot about election reform, but it seems it breaks into two areas. one is the campaign and the other is the actual election itself. fixing the campaign is going to be tough, trying to get the money out of it, trying to get some forms in the place of our debates that actually give us a clear idea of who the candidate is and what they intend for the country -- that is a difficult and tall order. trying to streamline it so that it does not take two years to run for public office. these are difficult things to accomplish, and i do not know how we go about it. it seems as though there is a sign of election reform, the process itself,
. investors are selling yen on the tokyo foreign exchange on speculation policy makers at the bank of japan will agree to an inflation target proposed by the incoming administration. the new prime minister shinzo abe will take up office later in the day. analysts say the b.o.j. will likely further boost its monetary easing measures. the dollar is currently trading at 85.26-31 yen. ai uchida joins us now from the business desk for more on that. so ai, investors have been trading the dollar-yen quite dramatically over the last several weeks. >> that's right, catherine. just a month and a half ago that pair was trading in the mid 79-yen range. almost six whole yen weaker in just six weeks. a dramatic move indeed. so going forward, what can we expect? well, we spoke to disaburo nezo for his outlook. he is a senior executive fellow at fujitsu research institute. >> the yen's future is not so much the weakening but rather i think there would be some counterbalance. that is, already yen current rate, 85 yen per one dollar, is rather reasonable level. i think the japanese exporters have been worryi
of the obama administration foreign policy. remember this was their big success, leading from behind. it fits into the administration narrative that the war on terror is over. that al qaeda has been defeated. that the arab spring has brought democracy to libya and the middle east. all that was disproven by the tragedy in benghazi on september the 11th and i think these are all questions senators want to hear answers to. gregg: do you think she and president obama both were convinced that the war on terror was over an al qaeda was defeated? >> yeah. i think their world view is badly misguided and i think it was ideology more than anything else that convinced them that certainly this could not have been a terrorist attack. it must have been a response by some demonstration, protesting the mohammed video, getting out of control. a lot of people in congress have said the mohammed video story was a cover-up. i actually hope for the good of the country that is true because at least it would demonstrate that the president understood reality. he was trying to sweep it aside. i'm worried that the ideo
? >> so in fact it very important to our foreign policy and we're exporting our way of thinking of intellectual property. >> this is treasury secretary tim geithner slamming china on exactly this. >> we're seeing china continue to be very, very aggressive in a tragedy that they started decades ago which goes like this, we want you to tell to our country, we want you to come produce here. if you want to come produce here, we want to you export from china. if you want to come to produce here, you need to transfer your technology to us. and they have made possible systematic stealing of intellectual property of american companies and have not been aggressive in putting in the protection for the intellectual property that everyone needs. >> this is one of the big objectives is making sure that there are legal agreements in place that are going to export our intellectual property regime. >> right. and economic espionage is something that could be draining america of economy. what i'm trying to get is a balance between the public access and the investors incentive and that's where we'
the bureau and employees there in an emergency. my foreign policy summit is to be there when there are emergencies around the world. i have colleagues i grew up with, judy woodruff has three children, including a child with special needs. compton has four children. producers are having children and coming back. our top producer is married to someone on the hill with two kids at home. she travels with the president all the time. there are ways. corporations are much more flexible in broadcasting now. alexander wallace, one of our top executives, ann curry with family. it can be done. it involves a lot of tough tradeoffs. our corporate culture ought to be more forgiving in support of. sadly, that is rarely the case. >> i was the chairman of the nrc. my son was entering high school. we made the decision not to move here to not disruptive. we left him in the school he was in. that means my husband during the week did everything. as much as i could, i went home every weekend. i did not participate in the washington social scene all the time. but we felt it was important to do the
at the biggest foreign policy events of the year. >> i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay. i went down to the liberal party. i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york. and a woman thought it was acucute. she asked me why and i made an early case for lindsey and i made the case against his opponent. she handed me a box of pastry. i took a back to headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics and i was told you can keep the money. >> david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. fall by the all women delegation of new hampshire. then growing up in the white house. tonight on c-span. >> there was a forum on women in leadership. hilda solis spoke about her career and serving in the obama administration. >> good morning. they come from los angeles and cleveland and baltimore. poor and white. each of them have one thing in common. they are all successful. each rose to the top of their field in the arts or politics or sports. we will talk
to breathe. i'm joined by a washington-based journalist who specializes in foreign policy. she attended a university in new delhi and has personally experienced what i understand is groping on public transportation. tell us, first of all, what is the -- what is going on? what is happening there that you've got even over the last, you know, years or so more than a tenfold increase in the past 40 years in india of this kind of violence against women. >> it's always been the case. it's not new as such. to be a woman in india is not an easy proposition. every woman has experienced some kind of abuse on public transportation, lewd remarks on the streets if you're walking down. no matter how conservatively you're dressed, you're still, you know, open season for the men. there is just a lot of reasons why this happens. patriarchal system is one, a lack of policing is another, and general treatment of women, which is not equal to men, even though it may be so under the law. >> you say you personally have experienced this as well. can you tell us about that. >> yes. i was a student at new delhi
it means to our own foreign policy. we asked the question yesterday if syria is blowing up and there's defections i will ask ambassador john bolt upon coming up why is it our responsibility? kelly, the u.s. always has to get involved but with tens of thousands people there being killed already maybe it is time. kelly: the ambassador will shed some light on that. i'm looking forward to the conversation as well. definitely something we'll be discussing. meantime, jamie, there are new weather warnings and out there and details on weather delays. we're tracking a massiveo# storm moving across theo# country this busy day aftero# christmas. jamie: a deadly tanker trucko# explosion shuts down a majoro# highway in one of america'so# busiest cities.o# if it is not hard enough to get around how about trying to maneuver around this? we'll tell you what happened. kelly: new details on the deadly ambush that killed two firefighters in webster new york. >> we're being shot at. i am shot. assault rifles. we have multiple firemen down. working fire. [ cellphone chirping ] [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive
to protect, which is a foreign policy concept that if there are people in harm's way that the united states government has a responsibility to protect. jaime: he drew a red line. on top of that he drew the red line, president obama did and said that chemical weapons were the point at which we wouldn't sit back any more. >> right. jaime: so what can we do? >> that was the new red line. that was the new red line. jaime: yes, and what are we equipped to do if we did respond? >> well certainly waiting 21 months of doing practically nothing has made the situation worse. so we are in a deeper problem now. if we would have acted 21 months ago to support the opposition -- look, i think that it's actually more humane to give the opposition enough arms to stop this. if we would have done this months ago we would have been able to have the end of this after six or seven months. but now since we've ignored it 21 months of violence, i don't think is a very moral position to be in. i think if we would have armed the opposition earlier it would have ended earlier, and that's i think a more compelling mora
want to introduce herb. she has her own show on them as nbc. she covers foreign-policy for the network. she is one of the bust respected and we are delighted she is here. next to her is surely an jackson. she has 51 of honorary degrees. she has been the first of everything -- the national science foundation. she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at and i.t.. [applause] she is an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she has been called the health czar of america. the point guard over hauling the system. how about that for a job? what a powerhouse right here. so we actually have a lot of brainpower up here. all of you could have done very different things. you had a lot of choices. i would love to hear about how you ended up taking what you did. who wants to start? >> a failed of violinist. i was raised to be a musician. my mother still asks may what happened. i was always interested in politics and writing stories for the paper. it actually was complete serendipity. i was in college and was at a meeting of the naacp. we had some big issues. this was the 196
evaluating the investment landscape in india. obviously we've seen a lot of foreign investors allocate capital into this market. we are looking at the rupee depreciating significantly over the last year. the company dealing with other problems including lack of infrastructure, some policy changes. what is your recent -- i guess your updated outlook on india going forward? >> well, the local market has justice done phenomenally in 2012. up 25%. but it didn't help u.s. dollar investors because the currency fell the same amount. so really everyone kind of broke even even though the market took off this year. i think india is still a market where you want to keep building positions gradually over time. there's been a lot of issues around the government. i think the instakt around the government and people's predicting how long it will take to push back reforms has impacted the market quite a bit. i think one thing under the surface in india and china that all investors need to be aware of is the fact that corporate debt is now really building up to almost unhealthy levels. and i would keep
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)